Posted by: Jeanie F | February 13, 2011

E-Books Are Making Inroads

This is a big week for e-book news:

New York Times Adds E-Books to Best Seller Lists

First, The New York Times has modified thek best-seller lists. Here’s what they say:

There are two entirely new lists in our print edition. One consists of rankings (fiction and nonfiction) that combine print and e-book sales; the other is limited exclusively to e-book sales (fiction and nonfiction).

Further rankings and a full explanation of how they were obtained are available on the NYT website at http://www.nytimes.com/best-sellers-books/2011-02-20/combined-print-and-e-book-fiction/list.html. This is well worth reading, as it explains some of the discrepencies in how paper books and e-books sales are tracked.

In the paper itself there are pretty nifty bar graphs that show side-by-side sales rankings of each of the top ten best sellers.  For example, John Grisham’s The Confession is ranked 26th in print, but 6th in electronic form. This format isn’t available in the online version of the paper.

Kindles Get Free Software Updates

Image of Kindle

Amazon’s Kindle Daily Post blog announced new features that they are rolling out on Kindle:

  1. Public Notes – Not exactly new, and somewhat controversial, it sounds as if this feature has been refined to allow you to be more selective about who and what you share. The upgrade will allow you to develop your own social network through Kindle, in  which you can choose to share notes, reviews, etc. with friends and family. The earlier version was an “all or nothing” deal – either you read highlights and notes that anyone could enter (and you never knew who), or you turned the application off completely.
  2. Read Page Numbers – This is one of the biggest complaints that new Kindle users have: they miss having page numbers. Personally, I’ve learned to like the % of book read information you get, but page numbers will definitely make discussions in class or in book clubs much easier. Page numbers will also become available on Kindle apps in the near future.
  3. Before You Go – This feature will allow you to “rate the book, share a message about the book with your social network, get personalized recommendations for what to read next, and see more books by the same author.” I hope it isn’t just one more advertising ploy and, if so, it can be disabled.
  4. New Newspaper and Magazine Layout – Will give you a quick snapshot of the news to help you decide what you want to read.

If you own the latest Kindle versions, you can download the early preview release at http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/ref=hp_navbox_top_kindlelg?nodeId=200529700.

The Atlantic Partners with Kindle to Release Short Fiction and Essays

November: The Lawrence...

From its first issue more than 150 years ago, The Atlantic has discovered some of the most celebrated short fiction from writers like Joyce Carol Oates, Paul Theroux, and Curtis Sittenfeld.

In the spirit of that tradition, The Atlantic partnered with Kindle to offer never-before-published works by these authors and to introduce readers to some of the most promising literary talent today.

These offerings will include “Never-Before-Published” stories from established writers (I’ve very excited to see Charles Baxter on that list), “New Voices,” and “Stories from the Archives.” Since the archives go back to 1857, you can read stories by Harriet Beacher Stowe, Rudyard Kipling, and many other classic writers.

For more information, go to http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html/ref=pe_128790_18734850_pe_btn/?docId=1000463361 and check it out.


Responses

  1. Why does one combine print and ebook and the other only ebook? It seems a bit strange that they wouldn’t also have a print only list?

  2. They do have print-only lists. I didn’t mention them because they aren’t new – they’ve had that as part of the NY Time Book Review for years. It’s one of my favorite sources for new titles!

  3. I’ve kept my copy of the Times book review section for future reference, by I haven’t succumbed to the e-book yet.


What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories